Antarctica & The Ross Sea Expedition (Hobart/Tasmania to Christchurch/Lyttleton)

Antarctica & The Ross Sea Expedition (Hobart/Tasmania to Christchurch/Lyttleton)

Starting at $34,149


Destinations & Sightseeing
Itinerary and Meals
Accomodations

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As one of the boldest journeys in the inaugural season, this expedition travels south to Antarctica. Guests will explore the Ross Ice Shelf and visit the historical “huts” of the great explorers that have come before, like Scott and Shackleton, as well as McMurdo Station and Scott Base. There will be epic quests in search of penguin colonies, glacier landings and the thrilling experience of cruising through pack ice on the fully-equipped Polar Class 6 yacht.

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Map for Antarctica & The Ross Sea Expedition (Hobart/Tasmania to Christchurch/Lyttleton)


Destination & Sightseeing

ITINERARY

Hobart/Tasmania, Australia
Situated between Mount Wellington and the Derwent River, Hobart is recognized as one of the world’s most beautiful harbor cities – as well as an Antarctic gateway. History adds picturesque charm to this Tasmanian capital, for there are no less than 90 buildings with National Trust classification. At Salamanca Place and Battery Point, relics of the last century’s whaling days can still be seen.

(At Sea)

(At Sea)

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Balleny Islands, New Zealand
The isolated and pristine Balleny Islands, discovered by English sealer John Balleny in 1839, are an archipelago straddling the Antarctic Circle in the Ross Sea. The uninhabited islands and their nutrient-rich waters are part of the world’s largest marine reserve. This surreal, snow-covered wonderland of glaciated, volcanic islands and ice floes is perfect for cruising and possible sightings of humpback whales, which feed on the region’s abundant krill and plankton.

(At Sea)

Cape Adare, Antarctica
History buffs are in for a treat at Cape Adare where the remains of the oldest buildings in Antarctica are located. The two prefabricated huts were built on Ridley Beach during the 1899 expedition of Norwegian explorer Carsten Borchgrevink and were later used by British explorer Robert Falcon Scott’s team in 1911. The historic huts are surrounded by the world’s largest Adélie penguin colony.

Cape Hallet and Roget, Antarctica
The majestic peaks of the Admiralty Mountains welcome you to Cape Hallett. Framed by the Ross Sea, the Southern Ocean and several glaciers, the ranges are situated in Antarctica’s northeastern Victoria Land. Discovered by British explorer James Clark Ross in 1841, the cape is known for its large Adélie penguin colony. Just to the north of Cape Hallett lies Cape Roget, marking the north entrance to Moubray Bay. Cape Roget is home to an emperor penguin rookery.

Tera Nova Bay, Antarctica
The iceberg-dotted Terra Nova Bay beckons with the possibility of stepping foot on the continent of Antarctica. Nestled along the coast of Victoria Land between Cape Washington and the Drygalski Ice Tongue, a massive glacier that flows out into the ocean, the bay area hosts a few scientific stations, including Italy’s Zucchelli Station, known for its research on marine biology, oceanography, seismology and more. Adélie and emperor penguins as well as Weddell seals may be spotted in the bay.

Cape Royds, Ross Island, Antarctica
Discovered by Captain James Ross in 1840, this island is home to Antarctica’s biggest scientific station, McMurdo Station, and Scott’s Discovery Hut. At 950 square miles, it is often considered part of the Antarctic mainland due the continuous presence of the ice sheet. Formed by four volcanoes – including the world’s southernmost active volcano, Erebus, and the dormant Terror, both named for Ross’ expedition ships – it is the highest island in Antarctica and the sixth highest in the world.

Cape Royds, Ross Island, Antarctica
Discovered by Captain James Ross in 1840, this island is home to Antarctica’s biggest scientific station, McMurdo Station, and Scott’s Discovery Hut. At 950 square miles, it is often considered part of the Antarctic mainland due the continuous presence of the ice sheet. Formed by four volcanoes – including the world’s southernmost active volcano, Erebus, and the dormant Terror, both named for Ross’ expedition ships – it is the highest island in Antarctica and the sixth highest in the world.

Cape Evans, Ross Island, Antarctica
Discovered by Captain James Ross in 1840, this island is home to Antarctica’s biggest scientific station, McMurdo Station, and Scott’s Discovery Hut. At 950 square miles, it is often considered part of the Antarctic mainland due the continuous presence of the ice sheet. Formed by four volcanoes – including the world’s southernmost active volcano, Erebus, and the dormant Terror, both named for Ross’ expedition ships – it is the highest island in Antarctica and the sixth highest in the world.

Cape Evans, Ross Island, Antarctica
Discovered by Captain James Ross in 1840, this island is home to Antarctica’s biggest scientific station, McMurdo Station, and Scott’s Discovery Hut. At 950 square miles, it is often considered part of the Antarctic mainland due the continuous presence of the ice sheet. Formed by four volcanoes – including the world’s southernmost active volcano, Erebus, and the dormant Terror, both named for Ross’ expedition ships – it is the highest island in Antarctica and the sixth highest in the world.

Mcmurdo Sound, Antarctica
Referred to as the “final hint of civilization” in Antarctica, McMurdo Station is home base for research to many geologists, oceanographers, physicists, glaciologists and many others. Coupled with guided tours of Scott Base and other significant sites with expedition staff and liaisons from the United States National Science Foundation and Environmental Protection Agency and hikes to Observation Hill, time spent in this ethereal place will strike awe in even the boldest adventurers.

Marble Point Region,Dry Valley, Antarctica
In this remote expanse of Antarctica that resembles Mars more than it does earth, the McMurdo Dry Valleys represent a region of earth where life approaches its environment limits – remarkable ice-free dry deserts boasting a geological playground of fossils and salt accumulations. Be among the few to tread in this place that is unlike any other in the world, reaching the scientific stations and historic huts by helicopter.

(At Sea)

Coulman Island, Antarctica
A treasure trove of geologic history, scenic Coulman Island is located in the Ross Sea off the coast of northern Victoria Land, Antarctica. Its picturesque landscape of mountains and cliffs dappled with snow is actually a complex of shield volcanoes, massive dome-shaped formations built of lava flows. Its most notable feature is the three-mile-wide, 2,300-foot-deep caldera on the southern end of the island. Coulman’s untouched terrain hosts a large colony of emperor penguins.

(At Sea)

(At Sea)

(At Sea)

(At Sea)

(At Sea)

Christchurch/Lyttleton, New Zealand
The historic port of Lyttelton serves as the gateway to Christchurch, the largest city on New Zealand’s South Island. Traditionally considered the most English of New Zealand’s cities, there is much to explore in vibrant Christchurch, from its neo-Gothic stone buildings and beautiful botanical gardens, to its picturesque Avon River lined by graceful willows. Further afar, the Canterbury Plains, snow-capped Southern Alps and numerous rivers beckon with their enchanting beauty and wildlife.

Check Mark Disclaimer: Prices listed are per person, based on double occupancy, and in USD. All promotions are valid for new bookings only, capacity controlled and valid on select dates and departures. Individual Terms and Conditions will apply to all promotions. Any promotion can be withdrawn at any time without notice. Please speak with your Pavlus Travel Planner for complete vendor terms and conditions, including eligible tour and cruise dates.