Beyond the Aleutian Isles (Seward (for Anchorage) to Anadyr)
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Beyond the Aleutian Isles (Seward (for Anchorage) to Anadyr)

Starting at $14,449


Destinations & Sightseeing
Itinerary and Meals
Accomodations

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Deep green forests, icy blue glaciers and strikingly monochrome orcas paint the scenery in remote corners of Alaska and the Aleutian Islands.

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Map for Beyond the Aleutian Isles (Seward (for Anchorage) to Anadyr)


Destination & Sightseeing

ITINERARY

Seward (for Anchorage), United States of America
Kenai Fjords National Park, Resurrection Bay, the SeaLife Center research aquarium, not to mention the charm of the town itself, all conspire to make Seward one of the most appealing destinations in Alaska. You might paddle a kayak on the lookout for sea otters, hike one of the many beautiful hiking trails near town, embark on a fishing expedition or ride a wheeled sled pulled by a team of 12 spry and intelligent dogs.

Homer, United States of America
Snow-capped mountains reaching thousands of feet skyward and glistening glaciers combine to create a dramatic backdrop for Homer on the southern Kenai Peninsula. Take a cruise to one of Alaska’s largest marine sanctuaries where thousands of seabirds come to nest. Paddle among the sea otters at Otter Cove. There’s halibut fishing, of course, along with galleries of local artists, interpretive hiking with a naturalist … even a world-famous Alaskan cooking school. Name your flavor, it’s all here in Homer.

The Triplets, United States of America
Green is the color of The Triplets, a chain of three high, grassy islets just off Kodiak Island. The abundant rainfall and mild maritime temperatures keep the foliage bright green year round throughout the Kodiak Island Borough. Talikud, the northernmost island and the highest of the three is home of the largest seabird rookery in the archipelago. Over 60,000 Tufted Puffins and a variety of other sea birds species nest along the shores and Harbor Seals inhabit the offshore rocks.

Kodiak, United States of America
Often called "Alaska's Emerald Isle," Kodiak Island is indeed magnificently green thanks to plentiful summer rains. It is also one of North America’s largest commercial fishing ports; both fish and wildlife are abundant in the area. Hikers will find the area a paradise as well, with a choice of splendid trails inside Kodiak's National Wildlife Refuge. Several fascinating museums exist here, including the Alutiiq Museum, which illuminates the cultural traditions of the indigenous Alutiiq people.

Semidi Islands, United States of America
The Cackling Goose is almost unknown — even by the most avid birders — unless they’ve made it to Semidi Islands where the once critically endangered Aleutian Cackling Goose has made a comeback. More than 2.4 million birds, almost half the breeding seabirds of the Alaska Peninsula, nest in the nine islands and numerous islets that were combined to form the Semidi Islands National Wildlife Refuge in 1932.There are over a million murres alone, as well as huge colonies of Horned Puffins.

Chignik, United States of America
About 200 miles west of Kodiak Island, Chignik (meaning Big Wind) is the first notable settlement on the lower Alaska Peninsula. There are only about 60 year-round residents, but that number can double during the summer months. Large canneries have operated here for over a century, and fishing enthusiasts come to toss their line for king salmon, Coho salmon and halibut.

Unga Spit, United States of America
Unga is the largest of the 20 Shumagin Islands. Step ashore to view a ghost town and the petrified remains of a metasequoia forest that existed some 25-million years ago. The ghost town is site of the lucrative Apollo Gold Mine that operated at the turn of the last century. Living attractions include Bald Eagles, foxes and otters, while beaches are home to the Stellar sea lion and pelagic birds are abundant.

Unga Island, Aleutian Islands, United States of America

Unimak Island,Aleutian Islands, United States of America
The largest Aleutian Island and closest to the mainland, Unimak is home to one of the most spectacular stratovolcanoes anywhere in the world. Mount Shishaldin is also one of the ten most active volcanoes in the world, its near-perfect cone rises over 9,000 feet on the south side of the island. Wildlife is also prolific including red foxes, ground squirrels, weasels and Alaska brown bears, while wolves and caribou contend for survival.

Dutch Harbor, United States of America
The port of Dutch Harbor, on tiny Amaknak Island, is connected by a bridge to the city of Unalaska, a onetime ancient Aleut Village. It lies 800 miles southwest of Anchorage in the heart of the Aleutian Islands along the "Ring of Fire," so named for the frequent volcanic activity along the Pacific Rim. These islands were the stepping-stones that lured Russian explorers to Alaska during the 1700s. Sea lions, whales, seals, sea otters, porpoises and rare seabirds are among the area’s wildlife.

Baby Islands, United States of America
Some of the most valuable seabird habitat in the Aleutian Islands is located about 16 miles from Unalaska. Baby Islands, a group of five small, flat-topped outcrops are important nesting grounds for several species that are rarely seen elsewhere, and it’s worth maneuvering through the challenging waters, especially to see Whiskered Auklets. The islands are one of the few places where these tiny birds nest. Baby Islands also teem with puffins, and are home to petrels, murrelets and guillemots.

St.George Island, Pribilof Isl, United States of America
Nearly 2.5 million rare Red-legged Kittiwakes spend summer amid the soaring cliffs of St. George Island, one of the largest colonies in the northern hemisphere. But it was the fur seal that put the Pribilofs on the map. Searching for a new source of furs, Gavrill Pribilof discovered St. George in 1786. Thankfully in 1984, the US ended all seal hunting here except for subsistence use.

St.Paul Island, Probilof Islan, United States of America
Nearly 250 species of birds have been recorded in the Pribilof Islands. On St. Paul, the largest island, vertical cliffs rising straight out of the sea are crowded with hundreds of thousands, of nesting birds, and even the rare Red-legged Kittiwake is common. Rarer, still, is the dwindling number of native residents. The Pribilofs are home to the world’s largest Aleut population, and their unique customs along with the legacy of fur traders make the islands a destination of cultural interest, as well.

St.Paul Island, Probilof Islan, United States of America
Nearly 250 species of birds have been recorded in the Pribilof Islands. On St. Paul, the largest island, vertical cliffs rising straight out of the sea are crowded with hundreds of thousands, of nesting birds, and even the rare Red-legged Kittiwake is common. Rarer, still, is the dwindling number of native residents. The Pribilofs are home to the world’s largest Aleut population, and their unique customs along with the legacy of fur traders make the islands a destination of cultural interest, as well.

St. Matthews Island, United States of America
More than 200 miles from the nearest village, St. Matthew is an extremely isolated and secluded island, even by Alaska standards. Artic Foxes and Insular Voles (a small rodent) are the only resident mammals. At one time reindeer numbered over 6,000, but suddenly vanished due to extreme snow accumulation. At the most southerly point, huge sea cliffs are home to murres, kittiwakes, cormorants and others, including the snow-white McKay’s Bunting, endemic to the island.

(At Sea)

Nome, United States of America
Sitting at the tip of the Seward Peninsula jutting into the Bering Sea, Nome is about as far away as you can get in Alaska without leaving the civilized world. Native culture, rugged adventure, amazing landscapes, renowned sporting events — Nome has it all. The world-famous Trail Sled Dog Iditarod Race finishes on Front Street. And here too, thousands of stampeders dug the beach for gold during the Great Nome Gold Rush in 1900.

Little Diomede Island, United States of America
Little Diomede Island (US) sits just two miles to the east of Big Diomede Island (Russia), separated not only by national affiliation but also by the International Dateline. Little Diomede is extremely isolated thanks to the rough seas and persistent fog. During the Cold War, the border between the US and the USSR separating the two became known as the "Ice Curtain." In 1987, however, Lynne Cox swam from Little Diomede to Big Diomede and was congratulated jointly by Mikhail Gorbachev and Ronald Reagan.

Anadyr, Russian Federation
The easternmost town in Russian, Anadyr has only been a town for just over a century. Its position along the Bering Sea made it pivotal to World War II air transport. Its airfield received thousands of American troops headed to the Eastern Front along the Alaska-Siberian air route, ironically sharing “twin city” status with former foe Bethel, Alaska. The remote town’s colorful architecture stands brightly against the open tundra, set against mountains and the Anadyr River.

(At Sea)

Anadyr, Russian Federation
The easternmost town in Russian, Anadyr has only been a town for just over a century. Its position along the Bering Sea made it pivotal to World War II air transport. Its airfield received thousands of American troops headed to the Eastern Front along the Alaska-Siberian air route, ironically sharing “twin city” status with former foe Bethel, Alaska. The remote town’s colorful architecture stands brightly against the open tundra, set against mountains and the Anadyr River.

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